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Volume 17, Number 12—December 2011

Research

Sealpox Virus in Marine Mammal Rehabilitation Facilities, North America, 2007–2009

Amira Roess1, Rebecca Levine, Laura Barth, Benjamin Monroe, Darin Carroll, Inger Damon, and Mary ReynoldsComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Main Article

Table 3

Characteristics of 11 marine mammal rehabilitation facilities that did or did not report sealpox among pinnipeds during the 12 months before survey of marine mammal centers, North America, 2007–2009

Characteristic Sealpox reported in facility in past 12 mo
No Yes
Animal enclosures
Shared by adults and pups* 1 2
Shared by different species 2 5
Quarantine space available 2 9
Frequency of pen disinfection
2×/d 0 3
1×/d 0 6
<1×/wk 2 0
Disinfectant used†
Any use 2 9
Bleach 1 8
Virkon 1 3
Chlorhex 2 2
Iodophores 0 2
Standard protocols for newly admitted pinnipeds†
Isolation/quarantine 1 9
Physical examination 2 9
Blood tests‡ 1 9
Vaccination§ 1 1
Coast
Atlantic 1 4
Pacific 1 5
Enclosure material†
Plastic 1 4
Fiberglass 1 7
Cement 1 5
Epoxy resin 1 1
Wire 0 1

*Adults, >1 y of age; pups, <1 y of age.
†Responses were not mutually exclusive.
‡Tests performed included pathogen screening for morbillivirus, Brucella spp., rabies virus, Leptospira spp., West Nile virus, heartworms, intestinal helminths, and avian influenza virus.
§Vaccinations included those against West Nile virus, rabies virus, and Leptospira spp.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA.

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