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Volume 17, Number 12—December 2011

Research

Molecular Epidemiology of Rift Valley Fever Virus

Antoinette A. Grobbelaar, Jacqueline Weyer, Patricia A. Leman, Alan Kemp, Janusz T. Paweska, and Robert SwanepoelComments to Author 
Author affiliations: National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Service, Sandringham, South Africa (A.A. Grobbelaar, J. Weyer, P.A Leman, A. Kemp, J.T. Paweska, R. Swanepoel); University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa (R. Swanepoel)

Main Article

Figure A1

Maximum-likelihood tree for a 490-nt section of the Gn glycoprotein gene of 111 isolates and derived strains of Rift Valley fever virus from Africa and Saudi Arabia, 1944–2010. The 95 unique sequences sorted into 15 lineages (A–O). Mean pairwise distances (p-distances) were <0.017 within lineages, and bootstrap values were >70%. Scale bar indicates substitutions per site. CAR, Central African Republic; SNS, Smithburn neurotropic strain.

Figure A1. Maximum-likelihood tree for a 490-nt section of the Gn glycoprotein gene of 111 isolates and derived strains of Rift Valley fever virus from Africa and Saudi Arabia, 1944–2010. The 95 unique sequences sorted into 15 lineages (A–O). Mean pairwise distances (p-distances) were <0.017 within lineages, and bootstrap values were >70%. Scale bar indicates substitutions per site. CAR, Central African Republic; SNS, Smithburn neurotropic strain.

Main Article

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