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Volume 17, Number 2—February 2011

Research

Arbovirus Prevalence in Mosquitoes, Kenya

A. Desiree LaBeaudComments to Author , Laura J. Sutherland, Samuel Muiruri, Eric M. Muchiri, Laurie R. Gray, Peter A. Zimmerman, Amy G. Hise, and Charles H. King
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, California, USA (A.D. LaBeaud); Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA (A.D. LaBeaud, L.J. Sutherland, L.R. Gray, P.A. Zimmerman, A.G. Hise, C.H. King); Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation, Nairobi, Kenya (S. Muiruri, E.M. Muchiri)

Main Article

Figure 2

PCR gel showing positive Rift Valley fever virus bands (90 bp). Lane 1, molecular mass ladder; lane 2, Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 positive control; lane 3, negative control; lane 4, pool 103 (positive); lane 5, pool 86 (negative); lane 6, pool 104 (negative); lane 7, pool 87 (negative); lane 8, pool 105 (positive).

Figure 2. PCR gel showing positive Rift Valley fever virus bands (90 bp). Lane 1, molecular mass ladder; lane 2, Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 positive control; lane 3, negative control; lane 4, pool 103 (positive); lane 5, pool 86 (negative); lane 6, pool 104 (negative); lane 7, pool 87 (negative); lane 8, pool 105 (positive).

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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