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Volume 17, Number 3—March 2011

Research

Amplification of Emerging Viruses in a Bat Colony

Jan Felix Drexler1, Victor Max Corman1, Tom Wegner, Adriana Fumie Tateno, Rodrigo Melim Zerbinati, Florian Gloza-Rausch, Antje Seebens, Marcel A. Müller, and Christian DrostenComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: University of Bonn Medical Centre, Bonn, Germany (J.F. Drexler, V.M. Corman, A.F. Tateno, R.M. Zerbinati, F. Gloza-Rausch, A. Seebens, M.A. Müller, C. Drosten); University of Bonn, Bonn (T. Wegner); Noctalis, Centre for Bat Protection and Information, Bad Segeberg, Germany (F. Gloza-Rausch, A. Seebens)

Main Article

Figure 1

A) Location of studied maternity bat roost (indicated by asterisk) in the state of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany (50°25′46.91′′N, 6°55′52.17′′E). Red shading indicates the distribution of the studied bat species (adapted from the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, v. 2010; www.iucnredlist.org). B) Cluster of Myotis myotis female bats hanging from the roof interior.

Figure 1. A) Location of studied maternity bat roost (indicated by asterisk) in the state of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany (50°25′46.91′′N, 6°55′52.17′′E). Red shading indicates the distribution of the studied bat species (adapted from the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, v. 2010; www.iucnredlist.org). B) Cluster of Myotis myotis female bats hanging from the roof interior.

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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