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Volume 17, Number 3—March 2011

Letter

Risk for Mycobacterium celatum Infection from Ferret

Eva Ludwig1Comments to Author , Udo Reischl1, Thomas Holzmann, Holger Melzl, Dirk Janik, Constanze Gilch, and Walter Hermanns
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany (E. Ludwig, D. Janik, W. Hermanns); Universitätsklinik Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany (U. Reischl, T. Holzmann, H. Melzl); Tierärztliche Klinik Nürnberg Hafen, Nuremberg, Germany (C. Gilch)

Main Article

Figure

Appearance of tissue from 3-year-old, neutered male, domestic ferret with Mycobacterium celatum infection. A) Gross appearance: multiple, round light brown foci over lungs. B) Histologic appearance, granulomatous pneumonia: alveoli filled with foamy macrophages, epithelioid cells, and a multinucleated giant cell; also mild interstitial infiltration with lymphocytes, plasma cells, and neutrophils. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, original magnification x200. Inset, slender, rod-shaped, acid-fast b

Figure. Appearance of tissue from 3-year-old, neutered male, domestic ferret with Mycobacterium celatum infection. A) Gross appearance: multiple, round light brown foci over lungs. B) Histologic appearance, granulomatous pneumonia: alveoli filled with foamy macrophages, epithelioid cells, and a multinucleated giant cell; also mild interstitial infiltration with lymphocytes, plasma cells, and neutrophils. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, original magnification x200. Inset, slender, rod-shaped, acid-fast bacilli in the cytoplasm of epithelioid cells; Ziehl-Neelsen staining, original magnification x400. A color version of this figure is available online (www.cdc.gov/EID/content/17/3/553-F.htm).

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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