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Volume 17, Number 4—April 2011

Research

Orthopoxvirus DNA in Eurasian Lynx, Sweden

Morten TrylandComments to Author , Malachy Ifeanyi Okeke, Carl Hård af Segerstad, Torsten Mörner, Terje Traavik, and Marie-Pierre Ryser-Degiorgis
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Tromsø, Norway (M. Tryland); University of Tromsø, Tromsø (M.I. Okeke, T. Traavik); National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden (C. Hård af Segerstad, T. Mörner, M.-P. Ryser-Degiorgis); Genøk—Centre for Biosafety, Tromsø (M.I. Okeke, T. Traavik); University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland (M.-P. Ryser-Degiorgis)

Main Article

Figure 2

Multiple sequence alignment of the partial thymidine kinase (tk) gene obtained from Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) compared with the tk gene from other orthopoxviruses (OPVs). OPV-TK-23 represents all 21 sequences obtained from lynx tissues because they had 100% sequence homology. Swe.H1 and Swe.H2 represent 2 cowpox virus isolates from persons in Sweden. No.H1 and No.F1 represent cowpox virus isolates from a human and a felid, in Norway, respectively.

Figure 2. Multiple sequence alignment of the partial thymidine kinase (tk) gene obtained from Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) compared with the tk gene from other orthopoxviruses (OPVs). OPV-TK-23 represents all 21 sequences obtained from lynx tissues because they had 100% sequence homology. Swe.H1 and Swe.H2 represent 2 cowpox virus isolates from persons in Sweden. No.H1 and No.F1 represent cowpox virus isolates from a human and a felid, in Norway, respectively.

Main Article

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