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Volume 17, Number 4—April 2011

Dispatch

Drug-Resistant Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, South Korea1

Soo Youn Shin, Chun Kang, Jin Gwack, Joon Hyung Kim, Hyun Su Kim, Young A Kang, Ha Gyung Lee, Jin Seok Kim, Jong-Koo Lee, and Sung-Han KimComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Seoul, South Korea (S.Y. Shin, C. Kang, J. Gwack, J.H. Kim, H.S. Kim, Y.A. Kang, H.G. Lee, J.S. Kim, J.-K. Lee); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (S.-H. Kim)

Main Article

Figure

Clinical course and outcome of 11 patients with oseltamivir-resistant pandemic (H1N1) 2009, South Korea. Symptom aggravation was defined as influenza-related symptoms that worsened regardless of new infiltrations seen by chest radiography. Symptom improvement was defined as influenza-related symptoms (nasal stiffness, sore throat, cough, myalgia, fatigue, headache, and fever) that were absent or mild. All doses of oseltamivir were given 2×/d. ED, emergency department.

Figure. Clinical course and outcome of 11 patients with oseltamivir-resistant pandemic (H1N1) 2009, South Korea. Symptom aggravation was defined as influenza-related symptoms that worsened regardless of new infiltrations seen by chest radiography. Symptom improvement was defined as influenza-related symptoms (nasal stiffness, sore throat, cough, myalgia, fatigue, headache, and fever) that were absent or mild. All doses of oseltamivir were given 2×/d. ED, emergency department.

Main Article

1Presented in part at the 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy; 2010 Sep 12–15; Boston, Massachusetts, USA (late-breaker posters session, abstract V-448c).

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