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Volume 17, Number 5—May 2011

Historical Review

Evidence of Tungiasis in Pre-Hispanic America

Vicente MacoComments to Author , Manuel Tantaleán, and Eduardo Gotuzzo
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, New York, USA; and Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru

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Figure 4

A) Polychromic Maranga culture fragment that portrays a torso and a tattooed left leg of a person holding a stick while extracting foreign bodies. Cluster lesions with elevated nodules and a central black depression suggest Tunga spp. infection. B) Closer view of the left heel. C) Details of the sole of the left foot, showing multiple holes over a brick-red surface, suggesting residual tungiasis lesions. No. 1219, courtesy of the Amano Museum Foundation.

Figure 4. A) Polychromic Maranga culture fragment that portrays a torso and a tattooed left leg of a person holding a stick while extracting foreign bodies. Cluster lesions with elevated nodules and a central black depression suggest Tunga spp. infection. B) Closer view of the left heel. C) Details of the sole of the left foot, showing multiple holes over a brick-red surface, suggesting residual tungiasis lesions. No. 1219, courtesy of the Amano Museum Foundation.

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