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Volume 17, Number 5—May 2011

Synopsis

Intravenous Artesunate for Severe Malaria in Travelers, Europe

Thomas ZollerComments to Author , Thomas Junghanss, Annette Kapaun, Ida Gjørup, Joachim Richter, Mats Hugo-Persson, Kristine Mørch, Behruz Foroutan, Norbert Suttorp, Salih Yürek, and Holger Flick
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany (T. Zoller, N. Suttorp, S. Yürek, H. Flick); Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany (T. Junghanss, A. Kapaun); The State University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark (I. Gjørup); Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany (J. Richter); Hospital of Helsingborg, Helsingborg, Sweden (M. Hugo-Persson); Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway (K. Mørch); Armed Forces Hospital, Berlin (B. Foroutan)

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Figure

Typical patterns of hemolysis in 2 travelers with severe malaria treated with intravenous artesunate, Europe, January 2006–June 2010. A) Patient 6 with recurring hemolysis. B) Patient 9 with persisting hemolysis. LDH, lactate dehydrogenase. * indicates blood transfusion. Gaps between symbols indicate periods when samples were not obtained.

Figure. Typical patterns of hemolysis in 2 travelers with severe malaria treated with intravenous artesunate, Europe, January 2006–June 2010. A) Patient 6 with recurring hemolysis. B) Patient 9 with persisting hemolysis. LDH, lactate dehydrogenase. * indicates blood transfusion. Gaps between symbols indicate periods when samples were not obtained.

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