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Volume 17, Number 5—May 2011

Dispatch

Rickettsia rickettsii Transmission by a Lone Star Tick, North Carolina

Edward B. BreitschwerdtComments to Author , Barbara C. Hegarty, Ricardo G. Maggi, Paul M. Lantos, Denise M. Aslett, and Julie M. Bradley
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA (E.B. Breitschwerdt, B.C. Hegarty, R.G. Maggi, D.M. Aslett, J.M. Bradley); Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA (P.M. Lantos)

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Figure

Images of lesion in the patient caused by bite from lone star tick. A) Erythematous circular lesion in right armpit at site of tick bite with induration and a necrotic center. B) Maculopapular rash involving the inferior portion of the arm. Source: Julie M. Bradley.

Figure. Images of lesion in the patient caused by bite from lone star tick. A) Erythematous circular lesion in right armpit at site of tick bite with induration and a necrotic center. B) Maculopapular rash involving the inferior portion of the arm. Source: Julie M. Bradley.

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