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Volume 17, Number 6—June 2011

Research

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Risk for Frontline Health Care Workers

Caroline MarshallComments to Author , Anne Kelso, Emma McBryde, Ian G. Barr, Damon P. Eisen, Joe Sasadeusz, Kirsty Buising, Allen C. Cheng, Paul Johnson, and Michael Richards
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne (C. Marshall, E. McBryde, D.P. Eisen, J. Sasadeusz, M. Richards); University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (C. Marshall, P. Johnson); World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza, Melbourne (A. Kelso, I.G. Barr); St Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne (K. Buising); Monash University and Alfred Hospital, Melbourne (A.C. Cheng)

Main Article

Table 2

Characteristics of clinical and nonclinical participants at 4 hospitals at study entry (unless otherwise specified) who were infected with pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Australia, August 24–December 16, 2009*

Factor Clinical participants, n = 231 Nonclinical participants, n = 215
Antibody titer >40 46 (19.9) 33 (15.3)
Mean age, y (range) 35.1 (19.8–56.6) 43.2 (18.5–74.1)
Female gender 157 (68.0) 153 (71.2)
Seasonal vaccination 2009 163 (70.1) 141 (65.6)
Previous seasonal vaccination 187 (80.0) 152 (70.7)
Reported confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus infection 1 (0.4) 0
Other influenza-like illness 155 (67.1) 118 (54.9)
Oseltamivir prophylaxis 13 (5.6) 1 (0.5)
Community contact with influenza 42 (18.2) 46 (21.4)
Median no. children <18 years in household (range) 0 (0–7) 0 (0–3)
Nasal swab taken during study 30 (12.9) 16 (7.4)
Mean no. hours worked per week (range) 39.2 (8–90) 37.9 (6–86)

*Values are no. (%) except as indicated.

Main Article

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