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Volume 17, Number 8—August 2011

Dispatch

Cowpox Virus in Llama, Italy

Giusy CardetiComments to Author , Alberto Brozzi, Claudia Eleni, Nicola Polici, Gianlorenzo D’Alterio, Fabrizio Carletti, Maria Teresa Scicluna, Concetta Castilletti, Maria R. Capobianchi, Antonino Di Caro, Gian Luca Autorino, and Demetrio Amaddeo
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Regioni Lazio e Toscana, Rome, Italy (G. Cardeti, A. Brozzi, C. Eleni, M.T. Scicluna, G.L. Autorino, D. Amaddeo); Azienda Unità Sanitaria Locale, Viterbo, Italy (N. Polici); Ambulatorio Veterinario Farnese, Farnese, Italy (G. D’Alterio); National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Rome (F. Carletti, C. Castilletti, M.R. Capobianchi, A. Di Caro)

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Figure 1

A) Skin lesions showing a crater morphologic appearance typical of poxvirus around the anus of a llama from a farm near Calcata (Viterbo) in Northern Latium, Italy. B) Electron micrography image of skin lesion sample showing negatively stained brick viral particle of ≈160–220 nm, consistent with orthopoxvirus. Scale bar = 1 µm.

Figure 1. A) Skin lesions showing a crater morphologic appearance typical of poxvirus around the anus of a llama from a farm near Calcata (Viterbo) in Northern Latium, Italy. B) Electron micrography image of skin lesion sample showing negatively stained brick viral particle of ≈160–220 nm, consistent with orthopoxvirus. Scale bar = 1 µm.

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