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Volume 17, Number 8—August 2011

Dispatch

West Nile Virus Infection in Killer Whale, Texas, USA, 2007

Judy St. LegerComments to Author , Guang Wu, Mark Anderson, Les Dalton, Erika Nilson, and David Wang
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: SeaWorld, San Diego, California, USA (J. St. Leger, E. Nilson); Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA (G. Wu, D. Wang); University of California at Davis, Davis, California, USA (M. Anderson); SeaWorld, San Antonio, Texas, USA (L. Dalton)

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Figure

Brain specimen from killer whale (Orcinus orca) with West Nile virus infection that died at a marine park, San Antonio, Texas, USA, 2007. Neurons and glial cells demonstrate abundant intracytoplasmic West Nile viras antigen. Blood vessel demonstrates mild vasculitis and perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate. Original magnification ×200.

Figure. Brain specimen from killer whale (Orcinus orca) with West Nile virus infection that died at a marine park, San Antonio, Texas, USA, 2007. Neurons and glial cells demonstrate abundant intracytoplasmic West Nile viras antigen. Blood vessel demonstrates mild vasculitis and perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate. Original magnification ×200.

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