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Volume 17, Number 8—August 2011

Research

Asymptomatic Primary Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Infection among Adults

Yanis L. Tolstov, Alycia Knauer, Jian Guo Chen, Thomas W. Kensler, Lawrence A. Kingsley1, Patrick S. Moore1, and Yuan Chang1Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA (Y.L. Tolstov, A. Knauer, T.W. Kensler, L.A. Kingsley, P.S. Moore, Y. Chang); Qidong Liver Cancer Institute, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China (J.G. Chen); Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA (T.W. Kensler)

Main Article

Figure 2

Age-dependent prevalence of Merkel cell polyomavirus antibodies among the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study participants, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. A small but significant linear trend for Merkel cell polyomavirus positivity with age among adult gay and bisexual men plateaued in the 35–45-year-old age group. Whiskers represent 95% confidence intervals.

Figure 2. Age-dependent prevalence of Merkel cell polyomavirus antibodies among the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study participants, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. A small but significant linear trend for Merkel cell polyomavirus positivity with age among adult gay and bisexual men plateaued in the 35–45-year-old age group. Whiskers represent 95% confidence intervals.

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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