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Volume 17, Number 8—August 2011

Dispatch

Novel Lyssavirus in Natterer’s Bat, Germany

Conrad M. FreulingComments to Author , Martin Beer, Franz J. Conraths, Stefan Finke, Bernd Hoffmann, Barbara Keller, Jeannette Kliemt, Thomas C. Mettenleiter, Elke Mühlbach, Jens P. Teifke, Peter Wohlsein, and Thomas Müller
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Wusterhausen, Germany (C.M. Freuling, F.J. Conraths, J. Kliemt, T. Müller); Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Greifswald-Insel Riems, Germany (M. Beer, S. Finke, B. Hoffmann, T.C. Mettenleiter, J.P. Teifke); Lower Saxony State Office for Consumer Protection and Food Safety, Hannover, Germany (B. Keller); Nature and Biodiversity Conservation Union, Berlin, Germany (E. Mühlbach); University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover (P. Wohlsein)

Main Article

Figure 1

Immunohistochemical analysis of brain of Natterer’s bat for lyssavirus antigen by using the avidin biotin complex method. A) Cerebrum showing a large number of neurons. Cytoplasmic granular-to-diffuse staining for rabies antigen is visible in the perikarya and neuronal processus. B) Medulla and neurons of the nucleus funiculi lateralis showing strong cytoplasmic staining for rabies antigen. Original magnifications ×20.

Figure 1. Immunohistochemical analysis of brain of Natterer’s bat for lyssavirus antigen by using the avidin biotin complex method. A) Cerebrum showing a large number of neurons. Cytoplasmic granular-to-diffuse staining for rabies antigen is visible in the perikarya and neuronal processus. B) Medulla and neurons of the nucleus funiculi lateralis showing strong cytoplasmic staining for rabies antigen. Original magnifications ×20.

Main Article

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