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Volume 17, Number 8—August 2011

Research

Human Polyomavirus Related to African Green Monkey Lymphotropic Polyomavirus

Virginie Sauvage, Vincent Foulongne, Justine Cheval, Meriadeg Ar Gouilh, Kevin Pariente, Olivier Dereure, Jean Claude Manuguerra, Jennifer Richardson, Marc Lecuit, Ana Burguière, Valérie Caro, and Marc EloitComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Institut Pasteur, Paris, France (V. Sauvage, M. Ar Gouilh, K. Pariente, J.C. Manuguerra, M. Lecuit, A. Burguière, V. Caro, M. Eloit); Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Montpellier, France (V. Foulongne, O. Dereure); University of Montpellier, Montpellier (V. Foulongne, O. Dereure); Pathoquest, Paris (J. Cheval, M. Eloit); Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire d’Alfort, Maisons Alfort, France (J. Richardson, M. Eloit); Paris Descartes University, Paris (M. Lecuit)

Main Article

Figure 3

Identification of viral protein 1 (VP1) residues differing between human polyomavirus 9 (HPyV9) and lymphotropic polyomavirus (LPV). The DE, HI, and BC loops that extend outward from VP1 are indicated. The crystal structure of simian virus VP1, derived from strain 3BWQ, was used as a template. The red region in the center indicates part of a β strand, which is mostly hidden. Residues differing between HPyV9 and LPV are indicated by pink squares.

Figure 3. Identification of viral protein 1 (VP1) residues differing between human polyomavirus 9 (HPyV9) and lymphotropic polyomavirus (LPV). The DE, HI, and BC loops that extend outward from VP1 are indicated. The crystal structure of simian virus VP1, derived from strain 3BWQ, was used as a template. The red region in the center indicates part of a β strand, which is mostly hidden. Residues differing between HPyV9 and LPV are indicated by pink squares.

Main Article

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