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Volume 17, Number 9—September 2011

Research

Central Venous Catheter–associated Nocardia Bacteremia in Cancer Patients

Fadi Al Akhrass, Ray Hachem, Jamal A. Mohamed, Jeffrey J. Tarrand, Dimitrios P. Kontoyiannis, Jyotsna Chandra, Mahmoud Ghannoum, Souha Haydoura, Ann Marie Chaftari, and Issam RaadComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA (F. Al Akhrass, R. Hachem, J.A. Mohamed, J. Tarrand, D.P. Kontoyiannis, A.M. Chaftari, I. Raad); Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA (J. Chandra, M. Ghannoum); University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland (J. Chandra, M. Ghannoum); Kansas University School of Medicine, Wichita, Kansas, USA (S. Haydoura)

Main Article

Figure 3

A) Confocal scanning laser microscopy image of central venous catheter tip in a patient with Nocardia nova complex central line–associated bloodstream infection. Bright green objects are viable biofilm bacteria, and orange-red objects are dead bacteria. Original magnification ×25. B) Scanning electron microscopy image of central venous catheter tip reveals biofilm surface structure. Original magnification ×5,000.

Figure 3. A) Confocal scanning laser microscopy image of central venous catheter tip in a patient with Nocardia nova complex central line–associated bloodstream infection. Bright green objects are viable biofilm bacteria, and orange-red objects are dead bacteria. Original magnification ×25. B) Scanning electron microscopy image of central venous catheter tip reveals biofilm surface structure. Original magnification ×5,000.

Main Article

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