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Volume 17, Number 9—September 2011

Dispatch

Q Fever among Culling Workers, the Netherlands, 2009–2010

Jane WhelanComments to Author , Barbara Schimmer, Peter Schneeberger, Jamie Meekelenkamp, Wim van der Hoek, Mirna Robert–Du Ry van Beest Holle, and Arnold IJff
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, the Netherlands (J. Whelan, B. Schimmer, P. Schneeberger, W. van der Hoek, M. Robert–Du Ry van Beest Holle); European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Stockholm, Sweden (J. Whelan); Jeroen Bosch Hospital, ’s-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands (P. Schneeberger, J. Meekelenkamp); ArboUnie, Utrecht, the Netherlands (A. IJff)

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Figure 2

Predicted probabilities of seroconversion among small ruminant culling workers by total hours worked, weighted mean farm size, and location on farm while working during December 2009–June 2010, the Netherlands. Seroconversion probabilities calculated by multivariable model adjusted for age group, occurrence of animal abortions on the farms worked, and compliance with wearing personal protective equipment.

Figure 2. Predicted probabilities of seroconversion among small ruminant culling workers by total hours worked, weighted mean farm size, and location on farm while working during December 2009–June 2010, the Netherlands. Seroconversion probabilities calculated by multivariable model adjusted for age group, occurrence of animal abortions on the farms worked, and compliance with wearing personal protective equipment.

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