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Volume 18, Number 1—January 2012

Research

Modeling Insights into Haemophilus influenzae Type b Disease, Transmission, and Vaccine Programs

Michael L. Jackson1Comments to Author , Charles E. Rose, Amanda Cohn, Fatima Coronado, Thomas A. Clark, Jay D. Wenger, Lisa Bulkow, Michael G. Bruce, Nancy E. Messonnier, and Thomas W. Hennessy
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Main Article

Table

Estimated annual prevaccination force of infection from Hib infectious persons to persons with susceptible, no-antibody status and estimated annual prevalence of Hib colonization in 3 modeled populations, stratified by age group*

Susceptible population, age group, y Hib infections caused by infectious persons/1,000 susceptible persons, by age group, y
Total no. cases
0–1 2–4 5–9 >10
United States
0–1 0.2 24.3 11.6 0.2 36.3
2–4 0.1 77.4 1.4 0.3 79.2
5–9 10.1 136.2 15.5 2.0 163.8
>10 7.0 78.5 9.2 0.8 95.5
Prevalence 1.1% 2.9% 5.3% 3.2% NA
England and Wales
0–1 0.6 15.4 10.7 1.7 28.4
2–4 3.1 62.8 11.2 1.9 79.0
5–9 10.1 133.6 16.8 1.9 162.5
>10 6.6 78.4 8.4 2.4 95.8
Prevalence 1.0% 3.0% 4.9% 3.0% NA
Alaska Natives
0–1 109.5 5.8 52.3 1.2 168.8
2–4 28.4 15.8 49.2 5.4 98.8
5–9 28.9 144.3 357.8 5.9 536.9
>10 28.4 21.7 80.3 64.7 195.1
Prevalence 5.2% 3.9% 9.9% 4.5% NA

*Values are no. infections except as indicated. Data are based on Hib simulation model. Hib, Haemophilus influenzae type b; NA, not applicable.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA.

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