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Volume 18, Number 10—October 2012

Letter

Human Parvovirus 4 Viremia in Young Children, Ghana

Jürgen May, Jan Felix Drexler, Ulrike Reber, Nimarko Sarpong, Ohene Adjei, Marcus Panning, Christian Drosten, and Anna Maria Eis-HübingerComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany (J. May); University of Bonn Medical Centre, Bonn, Germany (J.F. Drexler, U. Reber, C. Drosten, A.M. Eis-Hübinger); Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana (N. Sarpong); Kumasi Centre for Collaborative Research in Tropical Medicine Kumasi (O. Adjei); and Freiburg University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany (M. Panning)

Main Article

Figure

Parvovirus 4 DNA loads in virus–positive plasma specimens from children compared with those in whole blood samples previously tested (7), Ghana. Virus concentrations are given on a log scale on the y-axis. Each dot represents 1 specimen. Horizontal lines represent median values for each sample group. Children whose plasma was tested had a median age of 15 months, and children whose whole blood was tested had a median age of either 15 or 24 months. Viral load data (i. e., median viral load and ra

Figure. . Parvovirus 4 DNA loads in virus-positive plasma specimens from children compared with those in whole blood samples previously tested (7), Ghana. Virus concentrations are given on a log scale on the y-axis. Each dot represents 1 specimen. Horizontal lines represent median values for each sample group. Children whose plasma was tested had a median age of 15 months, and children whose whole blood was tested had a median age of either 15 or 24 months. Viral load data (i. e., median viral load and range) for the 2 groups of whole blood samples have been reported (7) and were included for comparison with plasma data from this study.

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