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Volume 18, Number 11—November 2012

CME ACTIVITY

Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Interactions in Children

Qingfu Xu, Anthony Almudervar, Janet R. Casey, and Michael E. PichicheroComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Rochester General Hospital Research Institute, Rochester, New York, USA (Q. Xu, M.E. Pichichero),; University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester (A. Almudervar); Legacy Pediatrics, Rochester (J.R. Casey)

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Figure

Nasopharyngeal colonization of children with Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis during routine doctor visits when healthy (triangles) and during visits for onset of acute otitis media (squares), Rochester, NY, USA, June 2006–May 2011. A) Single microbial colonization; B) polymicrobial colonization; C) overall colonization (single and polymicriobial). *p<0.05; **p<0.01, ***p<0.001, compared with healthy visits, by Fisher exact test.

Figure. . . . . . Nasopharyngeal colonization of children with Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis during routine doctor visits when healthy (triangles) and during visits for onset of acute otitis media (squares), Rochester, NY, USA, June 2006–May 2011. A) Single microbial colonization; B) polymicrobial colonization; C) overall colonization (single and polymicriobial). *p<0.05; **p<0.01, ***p<0.001, compared with healthy visits, by Fisher exact test.

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