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Volume 18, Number 11—November 2012

Research

Mycoplasmosis in Ferrets

Matti KiupelComments to Author , Danielle R. Desjardins, Ailam Lim, Carole Bolin, Cathy A. Johnson-Delaney, James H. Resau, Michael M. Garner, and Steven R. Bolin
Author affiliations: Michigan State University, Lansing, Michigan, USA (M. Kiupel, D.R. Desjardins, A. Lim, C. Bolin, S.R. Bolin); Eastside Avian and Exotic Animal Medical Center, Kirkland, Washington, USA (C.A. Johnson-Delaney); Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA (J.H. Resau); and Northwest ZooPath, Monroe, Washington, USA (M.M. Garner)

Main Article

Figure 4

Transmission electron micrograph of the lung from a 2-year-old ferret that died of acute dyspnea, showing loss of cilia in bronchial epithelial and cellular degeneration characterized by swelling of endoplasmatic reticulum, vacuolization of mitochondria with loss of christae, and intranuclear chromatin dispersion. Attached to the apical surface of a ciliated cell is a 0.8-μm pleomorphic mycoplasma-like organism (arrow). Scale bar = 0.5 µm.

Figure 4. . . Transmission electron micrograph of the lung from a 2-year-old ferret that died of acute dyspnea, showing loss of cilia in bronchial epithelial and cellular degeneration characterized by swelling of endoplasmatic reticulum, vacuolization of mitochondria with loss of christae, and intranuclear chromatin dispersion. Attached to the apical surface of a ciliated cell is a 0.8-μm pleomorphic mycoplasma-like organism (arrow). Scale bar = 0.5 µm.

Main Article

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