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Volume 18, Number 11—November 2012

Dispatch

Effect of Latitude on Seasonality of Tuberculosis, Australia, 2002–2011

Jennifer H. MacLachlanComments to Author , Caroline J. Lavender, and Benjamin C. Cowie
Author affiliations: Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, North Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (J.H. MacLachlan, C.J. Lavender, B.C. Cowie); Victorian Infectious Diseases Service, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (B.C. Cowie); and University of Melbourne, Parkville (B.C. Cowie)

Main Article

Figure 1

Australia with latitude lines, divided into north, central, and south regions according to latitude and ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Although Western Australia extends to the tropics, >90% of the state’s population lives below latitude 30°S (7). ACT, Australian Capital Territory; NSW, New South Wales; NT, Northern Territory; QLD, Queensland; SA, South Australia; TAS, Tasmania; VIC, Victoria; WA, Western Australia. Black, south region; dark gray, central region; light gray, north region.

Figure 1. . . . Australia with latitude lines, divided into north, central, and south regions according to latitude and ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Although Western Australia extends to the tropics, >90% of the state’s population lives below latitude 30°S (7). ACT, Australian Capital Territory; NSW, New South Wales; NT, Northern Territory; QLD, Queensland; SA, South Australia; TAS, Tasmania; VIC, Victoria; WA, Western Australia. Black, south region; dark gray, central region; light gray, north region.

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