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Volume 18, Number 3—March 2012

Synopsis

Occurrence, Transmission, and Zoonotic Potential of Chronic Wasting Disease

Samuel E. Saunders1, Shannon L. Bartelt-Hunt, and Jason C. BartzComments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, Nebraska, USA (S.E. Saunders, S.L. Bartelt-Hunt); Creighton University, Omaha (J.C. Bartz)

Main Article

Figure 1

US states and Canadian provinces reporting chronic wasting disease (CWD) cases. A) Year or season CWD was first identified/confirmed in captive (C) or free-ranging (F) cervids. Underlying map shows geographic distribution of CWD (from the US Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center, updated October 2011, www.nwhc.usgs.gov/disease_information/chronic_wasting_disease/). Light gray shading, current CWD in free-ranging populations; dark gray shading, known distribution of CWD in free-rangin

Figure 1. US states and Canadian provinces reporting chronic wasting disease (CWD) cases. A) Year or season CWD was first identified/confirmed in captive (C) or free-ranging (F) cervids. Underlying map shows geographic distribution of CWD (from the US Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center, updated October 2011, www.nwhc.usgs.gov/disease_information/chronic_wasting_disease/). Light gray shading, current CWD in free-ranging populations; dark gray shading, known distribution of CWD in free-ranging populations before 2000. All locations are approximations based on best available information. B) Cumulative totals of states and provinces that have reported CWD cases in captive or free-ranging cervids. Totals also include South Korea (2001, captive). Many states have reported captive cases for only 1 or 2 years.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: Stanford Law School, Stanford, California, USA.

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