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Volume 18, Number 3—March 2012

Research

Pathogenic Potential to Humans of Bovine Escherichia coli O26, Scotland

Margo E. Chase-ToppingComments to Author , Tracy Rosser, Lesley J. Allison, Emily Courcier, Judith Evans, Iain J. McKendrick, Michael C. Pearce, Ian Handel, Alfredo Caprioli, Helge Karch, Mary F. Hanson, Kevin G.J. Pollock, Mary E. Locking, Mark E.J. Woolhouse, Louise Matthews, J. Chris Low, and David L. Gally
Author affiliations: University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK (M.E. Chase-Topping, E. Courcier, M.C. Pearce, M.E.J. Woolhouse); The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, Edinburgh (T. Rosser, I. Handel, D.L. Gally); Scottish E. coli O157/VTEC Reference Laboratory, Edinburgh (L.J. Allison, M.F. Hanson); Scottish Agricultural College, Edinburgh (J. Evans, M.C. Pearce, J.C. Low); Biomathematics and Statistics Scotland, Edinburgh (I.J. McKendrick); Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy (A. Caprioli); University of Münster, Münster, Germany (H. Karch); Health Protection Scotland, Glasgow, UK (K.G.J. Pollock, M.E. Locking); University of Glasgow Veterinary School, Glasgow (L. Matthews)

Main Article

Figure 4

Schematic comparing farm-level (A) and animal-level (B) prevalences of Escherichia coli O157 and E. coli O26 in Scotland for different virulence levels. Analysis was done by using only the 338 farms sampled for both E. coli O157 and E. coli O26.

Figure 4. Schematic comparing farm-level (A) and animal-level (B) prevalences of Escherichia coli O157 and E. coli O26 in Scotland for different virulence levels. Analysis was done by using only the 338 farms sampled for both E. coli O157 and E. coli O26.

Main Article

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