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Volume 18, Number 3—March 2012

Research

Ocozocoautla de Espinosa Virus and Hemorrhagic Fever, Mexico

Maria N.B. Cajimat, Mary Louise Milazzo, Robert D. Bradley, and Charles F. FulhorstComments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA (M.N.B. Cajimat, M.L. Milazzo, C.F. Fulhorst); Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, USA (R.D. Bradley)

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Figure 1

Five states in southern Mexico in which rodents were captured. The star indicates where the rodents in this study were captured; the solid circle indicates the location of the hospital that provided care for the persons affected by hemorrhagic fever in the 1967 epidemic (17). Inset shows the location of Chiapas in Mexico. CAM, Campeche; CHP, Chiapas; OAX, Oaxaca; TAB, Tabasco; VER, Veracruz.

Figure 1. Chiapas (CHP) and surrounding states in southern Mexico. The star indicates where the rodents in this study were captured; the solid circle indicates the location of the hospital that provided care for the persons affected by hemorrhagic fever in the 1967 epidemic (17). Inset shows the location of CHP in Mexico. CAM, Campeche; OAX, Oaxaca; TAB, Tabasco; VER, Veracruz.

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