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Volume 18, Number 4—April 2012

Historical Review

Malaria in Highlands of Ecuador since 1900

Lauren L. PinaultComments to Author  and Fiona F. Hunter
Author affiliations: Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada

Main Article

Figure 4

Increase in yearly average daily temperature during a 24-hour period (▲) and average minimum nightly temperature (●) in Quito, Ecuador, 1891–1937, leading up to years of observation of highland malaria in valleys surrounding Quito. Although average temperature only increased at a rate of 0.017°C/year, minimum nightly temperature, which may be more essential for survival of Anopheles spp. species, increased at a rate of 0.045°C/year. Data were obtained from the Astronomical and Meteorological Obs

Figure 4. Increase in yearly average daily temperature during a 24-hour period (▲) and average minimum nightly temperature (●) in Quito, Ecuador, 1891–1937, leading up to years of observation of highland malaria in valleys surrounding Quito. Although average temperature only increased at a rate of 0.017°C/year, minimum nightly temperature, which may be more essential for survival of Anopheles spp. species, increased at a rate of 0.045°C/year. Data were obtained from the Astronomical and Meteorological Observatory of Quito (30).

Main Article

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