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Volume 18, Number 4—April 2012

Dispatch

Ikoma Lyssavirus, Highly Divergent Novel Lyssavirus in an African Civet1

Denise A. Marston, Daniel L. Horton, Chanasa Ngeleja, Katie Hampson, Lorraine M. McElhinney, Ashley C. Banyard, Daniel Haydon, Sarah Cleaveland, Charles E. Rupprecht, Machunde Bigambo, Anthony R. FooksComments to Author , and Tiziana Lembo
Author affiliations: Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency, Addlestone, UK (D.A. Marston, D.L. Horton, L.M. McElhinney, A.C. Banyard, A.R. Fooks); Central Veterinary Laboratory, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania (C. Ngeleja); University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, UK (K. Hampson, D. Haydon, S. Cleaveland, T. Lembo); National Consortium for Zoonosis Research, Neston, UK (L.M. McElhinney, A. R. Fooks); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (C.E. Rupprecht); Lincoln Park Zoo Tanzania Program, Arusha, Tanzania (M. Bigambo)

Main Article

Figure 1

Serengeti National Park and surrounding districts (Serengeti and Ngorongoro). Blue dot indicates location of Ikoma lyssavirus–infected African civet within Ikoma Ward in northwest Tanzania. Red dots indicate cases of rabies confirmed during 2003–2011. Top left, map of Africa indicating study area in Tanzania (gray box).

Figure 1. Serengeti National Park and surrounding districts (Serengeti and Ngorongoro). Blue dot indicates location of Ikoma lyssavirus–infected African civet within Ikoma Ward in northwest Tanzania. Red dots indicate cases of rabies confirmed during 2003–2011. Top left, map of Africa indicating study area in Tanzania (gray box).

Main Article

1These data were presented in part at the XXII Rabies in the Americas meeting in San Juan, Puerto Rico, October 16–21, 2011.

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