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Volume 18, Number 5—May 2012

Dispatch

Coxsackievirus A21, Enterovirus 68, and Acute Respiratory Tract Infection, China

Zichun Xiang, Richard Gonzalez, Zhong Wang, Lili Ren, Yan Xiao, Jianguo Li, Yongjun Li, Guy Vernet, Gláucia Paranhos-Baccalà, Qi Jin, and Jianwei WangComments to Author 
Author affiliations: MOH Key Laboratory of Systems Biology of Pathogens, Beijing, People’s Republic of China (Z. Xiang, L. Ren, J. Li, Q. Jin, J. Wang); Institute of Pathogen Biology, Beijing (Z. Xiang, R. Gonzalez, Z. Wang, L. Ren, Y. Xiao, J. Li, Q. Jin, J. Wang); Fondation Mérieux, Lyon, France (R. Gonzalez, Y. Li, G. Vernet, G. Paranhos-Baccalà); Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing (Z. Wang)

Main Article

Figure 1

Frequency of human enterovirus (HEV) serotypes detected among adult patients by using sequence analysis of a partial viral protein 1 gene, in Beijing, People’s Republic of China, August 2006–April 2010. A) Number of patients detected for each HEV serotype; B) Seasonal distribution of the HEVs in adults with acute respiratory tract infection. Numbers of samples tested in each month during the study period are shown on the right-side y-axis. CV, coxsackievirus; E, echovirus; EV, enterovirus.

Figure 1. . . Frequency of human enterovirus (HEV) serotypes detected among adult patients by using sequence analysis of a partial viral protein 1 gene, in Beijing, People’s Republic of China, August 2006–April 2010. A) Number of patients detected for each HEV serotype; B) Seasonal distribution of the HEVs in adults with acute respiratory tract infection. Numbers of samples tested in each month during the study period are shown on the right-side y-axis. CV, coxsackievirus; E, echovirus; EV, enterovirus.

Main Article

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