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Volume 18, Number 6—June 2012

Letter

Detection of European Strain of Echinococcus multilocularis in North America

Emily J. JenkinsComments to Author , Andrew S. Peregrine, Janet E. Hill, Christopher Somers, Karen Gesy, Brian Barnes, Bruno Gottstein, and Lydden Polley
Author affiliations: University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada (E. Jenkins, J.E. Hill, K. Gesy, L. Polley); University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada (A. Peregrine); University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada (C. Somers); Westview Veterinary Hospital, Powell River, British Columbia, Canada (B. Barnes); Universitat Bern, Bern, Switzerland (B. Gottstein)

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Figure

Location where European-type strain of Echinococcus multilocularis (plus sign) was detected in this study in British Columbia (BC) and previous reports of E. multilocularis parasites in 8 definitive (squares) and 6 intermediate (triangles) hosts in Canada. Gray shading indicates currently accepted distribution of E. multilocularis in North America. The North Central Region includes southern portions of the 3 Canadian prairie provinces (Alberta [AB], Saskatchewan [SK], and Manitoba [MB]) and 12 c

Figure. . . Location where European-type strain of Echinococcus multilocularis (plus sign) was detected in this study in British Columbia (BC) and previous reports of E. multilocularis parasites in 8 definitive (squares) and 6 intermediate (triangles) hosts in Canada. Gray shading indicates currently accepted distribution of E. multilocularis in North America. The North Central Region includes southern portions of the 3 Canadian prairie provinces (Alberta [AB], Saskatchewan [SK], and Manitoba [MB]) and 12 contiguous north-central US states (not shown). The western portion of the Northern Tundra Zone is based roughly on the established distribution of Arctic fox in Alaska (AK), the Yukon Territory (YT), Northwest Territories (NT), Nunavut (NU), northern MB, and northern Ontario (ON).

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