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Volume 18, Number 8—August 2012

Dispatch

Vertical Transmission of Babesia microti, United States

Julie T. JosephComments to Author , Kerry Purtill, Susan J. Wong, Jose Munoz, Allen Teal, Susan Madison-Antenucci, Harold W. Horowitz1, Maria E. Aguero-Rosenfeld1, Julie M. Moore, Carlos Abramowsky, and Gary P. Wormser
Author affiliations: New York Medical College, Valhalla, New York, USA (J.T. Joseph, K. Purtill, J. Munoz, H.W. Horowitz, M.E. Aguero-Rosenfeld, G.P. Wormser); New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York, USA (S.J. Wong, A. Teal, S. Madison-Antenucci); University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA (J.M. Moore); and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (C. Abramowsky)

Main Article

Figure

Peripheral blood smear of 6-week-old infant with suspected congenital babesiosis. Thin arrows indicate Babesia spp. parasites; thick arrow shows the classic tetrad formation or Maltese cross.

Figure. . Peripheral blood smear of 6-week-old infant with suspected congenital babesiosis. Thin arrows indicate Babesia spp. parasites; thick arrow shows the classic tetrad formation or Maltese cross.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.

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