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Volume 18, Number 8—August 2012

CME ACTIVITY - Research

Factors Related to Increasing Prevalence of Resistance to Ciprofloxacin and Other Antimicrobial Drugs in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, United States

Edward GoldsteinComments to Author , Robert D. Kirkcaldy, David Reshef, Stuart Berman, Hillard Weinstock, Pardis Sabeti, Carlos Del Rio, Geraldine Hall, Edward W. Hook, and Marc Lipsitch
Author affiliations: Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA (E. Goldstein, M. Lipsitch); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (R.D. Kirkcaldy, S. Berman, H. Weinstock); Oxford University, Oxford, UK (D. Reshef); Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA (P. Sabeti); Emory University, Atlanta (C. Del Rio); Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA (G. Hall); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA (E.W. Hook); and Jefferson County Department of Health, Birmingham (E.W. Hook)

Main Article

Table

Regression coefficients and the p values for 4 groups, according to resistance type and patient’s sexual orientation

Model* β0 (95% CI) βRTH (95% CI) βM (95% CI) Hosmer-Lemeshow p value
Men who have sex with men
Triply resistant −2.48 (−2.72 to −2.24) −0.328 (−0.650 to 0.005) 0.03 (0.023 to 0.037) 0.19
Monoresistant −3.75 (−4.42 to −3.08) 0.51 (−0.18 to 1.2) 0.046 (0.006 to 0.086) 0.18
Heterosexual men
Triply resistant −4.72 (−5.08 to −4.36) 1.17 (0.81 to1.53) 0.022 (0.011 to 0.033) 0.35
Monoresistant −5.05 (−5.49 to −4.60) 0.543 (−0.02 to 1.11) 0.018 (0.005 to 0.032) 0.69

*Logistic model given by equation 1.

Main Article

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