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Volume 18, Number 8—August 2012

Research

Outbreak of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase–producing Klebsiella oxytoca Infections Associated with Contaminated Handwashing Sinks1

Christopher Lowe, Barbara Willey, Anna O’Shaughnessy, Wayne Lee, Ming Lum, Karen Pike, Cindy Larocque, Helen Dedier, Lorraine Dales, Christine Moore, Allison McGeerComments to Author , and the Mount Sinai Hospital Infection Control Team
Author affiliations: University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (C. Lowe, A. McGeer); and Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (B. Willey, A. O’Shaughnessy, W. Lee, M. Lum, K. Pike, C. Larocque, H. Dedier, L. Dales, C. Moore, A. McGeer)

Main Article

Figure 1

Flow of extended-spectrum β -lactamase (ESBL)–producing Klebsiella oxytoca infection and colonization in patients at a hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, October 2006–March 2011. ICU, intensive care unit.

Figure 1. . . Flow of extended-spectrum β -lactamase (ESBL)–producing Klebsiella oxytoca infection and colonization in patients at a hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, October 2006–March 2011. ICU, intensive care unit.

Main Article

1Preliminary results of this research were presented at the 51st Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, September 17, 2011, Chicago, IL, USA.

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