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Volume 18, Number 8—August 2012

Dispatch

Capsular Switching in Invasive Neisseria meningitidis, Brazil1

Terezinha M. P. P. CastiñeirasComments to Author , David E. Barroso, Jane W. Marsh, Mary M. Tulenko, Mary G. Krauland, Maria C. Rebelo, and Lee H. Harrison
Author affiliations: Federal University of Rio de Janeiro School of Medicine, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (T.M.P.P. Castiñeiras); Oswaldo Cruz Institute, Rio de Janeiro (D.E. Barroso); University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA (J.W. Marsh, M.M. Tulenko, M.G. Krauland, L.H. Harrison); and Central Laboratory Noel Nutels, Rio de Janeiro (M.C. Rebelo)

Main Article

Table 1

Characteristics of patients with confirmed serogroup B:4 and serogroup C:4 meningococcal disease, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2000–2009

Characteristic No. (%) serogroup B:4, n = 179 No. (%) serogroup C:4, n = 30 p value
Female sex 93 (52.0) 20(66.7) 0.14
Age group, y 0.046*

<1

27 (15.1) 1 (3.3)

1–4

50 (27.9) 7 (23.3)

5–14

56 (31.3) 15(50.0)

15–24

24 (13.4) 4 (13.4)

25–64

22 (12.3) 3 (10.0)
Deceased 30 (16.8) 7(23.3) 0.38
Clinical features 0.11†

Septicemia without meningitis

22 (12.3) 7(23.3)

Meningitis + septicemia

93 (51.9) 12(40.0)

Meningitis only

64 (35.8) 11(36.7)

*p value for comparison of 5–14 y versus all other age groups combined.
†p value for comparison of septicemia without meningitis versus other clinical syndromes combined.

Main Article

1This study was presented in part at the 17th International Pathogenic Neisseria Conference, September 11–16, 2010, Banff, Alberta, Canada.

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