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Volume 18, Number 8—August 2012

Research

Population Diversity among Bordetella pertussis Isolates, United States, 1935–2009

Amber J. Schmidtke, Kathryn O. Boney, Stacey W. Martin, Tami H. Skoff, M. Lucia Tondella, and Kathleen M. TattiComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Main Article

Figure 5

Transitions of frequency (by proportion of all isolates tested) of dominant alleles for each multilocus sequence typing (MLST) type target within the Bordetella pertussis population, United States, 1935–2009. The previous dominant type is denoted by a solid line, with the new dominant type denoted by a dashed line of the same style. The dashed lines of prn2 and ptxP3 overlap with each other and multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) type 27 (Figure 6), which suggests they arose

Figure 5. . . Transitions of frequency (by proportion of all isolates tested) of dominant alleles for each multilocus sequence typing (MLST) type target within the Bordetella pertussis population, United States, 1935–2009. The previous dominant type is denoted by a solid line, with the new dominant type denoted by a dashed line of the same style. The dashed lines of prn2 and ptxP3 overlap with each other and multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) type 27 (Figure 6), which suggests they arose at approximately the same time and resulted in the new dominant MLVA + MLST profile. The transition from fim3A to fim3B occurred much later than the other transitions.

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