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Volume 18, Number 8—August 2012

Dispatch

Severe Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis Transmitted by Blood Transfusion

Matjaz JerebComments to Author , Blaz Pecaver, Janez Tomazic, Igor Muzlovic, Tatjana Avsic-Zupanc, Tanja Premru-Srsen, Snezna Levicnik-Stezinar, Primoz Karner, and Franc Strle
Author affiliations: University Medical Center Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia (M. Jereb, B. Pecaver, J. Tomazic, I. Muzlovic, T. Premru-Srsen); Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, Ljubljana (T. Avsic-Zupanc); and Blood Transfusion Center of Slovenia, Ljubljana (S. Levicnik-Stezinar)

Main Article

Figure

Histopathology slides from 36-year-old woman with human granulocytic anaplasmosis, Slovenia, 2010. Peripheral blood smear (A, B); bone marrow smear (C). Modified Giemsa staining, original magnification ×1,000. Morulae (clusters of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in granulocytic leukocytes) are indicated by arrows. In Europe, morulae have been reported in only 1 patient (6), but they are a relatively common observation in the United States, associated predominately with severe cases of human granulocyt

Figure. . . Histopathology slides from 36-year-old woman with human granulocytic anaplasmosis, Slovenia, 2010. Peripheral blood smear (A, B); bone marrow smear (C). Modified Giemsa staining, original magnification ×1,000. Morulae (clusters of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in granulocytic leukocytes) are indicated by arrows. In Europe, morulae have been reported in only 1 patient (6), but they are a relatively common observation in the United States, associated predominately with severe cases of human granulocytic anaplasmosis (7).

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