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Volume 18, Number 9—September 2012

CME ACTIVITY - Policy Review

Control of Fluoroquinolone Resistance through Successful Regulation, Australia

Allen C. Cheng, John Turnidge, Peter Collignon, David Looke, Mary Barton, and Thomas GottliebComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (A.C. Cheng); Alfred Hospital, Melbourne (A.C. Cheng); Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia (J. Turnidge); University of Adelaide, Adelaide (J. Turnidge); The Canberra Hospital, Garran, Canberra, Australia (P. Collignon); Australian National University, Canberra (P. Collignon); Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia (D. Looke); University of Queensland, Brisbane (D. Looke); University of South Australia, Adelaide (M. Barton); Concord Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (T. Gottlieb); and University of Sydney, Sydney (T. Gottlieb)

Main Article

Figure 1

Data from Drug Utilization Sub-Committee Drug Utilization Database on Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and the Repatriation Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (RPBS) on subsidized medicines and estimates of non-subsidized medicines. RPBS data were calculated from continuous data on all prescriptions dispensed from a validated sample of community-based pharmacies. In-patient hospital prescribing is not included. Usage rate calculated on the basis of medication use of 1,000 persons per day. DDD, defined

Figure 1. . . Data from Drug Utilization Sub-Committee Drug Utilization Database on Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and the Repatriation Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (RPBS) on subsidized medicines and estimates of non-subsidized medicines. RPBS data were calculated from continuous data on all prescriptions dispensed from a validated sample of community-based pharmacies. In-patient hospital prescribing is not included. Usage rate calculated on the basis of medication use of 1,000 persons per day. DDD, defined daily dose.

Main Article

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