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Volume 19, Number 1—January 2013

Letter

Primary Multidrug-Resistant Leprosy, United States

Diana Lynn WilliamsComments to Author , Timothy Hagino, Rahul Sharma, and David Scollard
Author affiliations: Author affiliations Health Resources and Services Administration, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA (D.L. Williams, R. Sharma, D. Scollard); Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge (D.L. Williams, R. Sharma, D. Scollard); John A. Burns School of Medicine, Aiea, Hawaii, USA (T. Hagino)

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Figure

Acid-fast organisms from biopsy specimens of a man with leprosy, United States. Fite-stained sections show numerous acid-fast bacilli in the initial skin biopsy (A) and in the biopsy taken at relapse, 6 years after completion of treatment (B). Both specimens demonstrate the clumps of Mycobacterium leprae referred to as globi. In panel B, bacilli can be seen within a cutaneous nerve (arrows), a finding that is pathognomonic of M. leprae. Original magnification ×1,000.

Figure. . Acid-fast organisms from biopsy specimens of a man with leprosy, United States. Fite-stained sections show numerous acid-fast bacilli in the initial skin biopsy specimen (A) and in the biopsy specimen taken at relapse, 6 years after completion of treatment (B). Both specimens demonstrate the clumps of Mycobacterium leprae referred to as globi. In panel B, bacilli can be seen within a cutaneous nerve (arrows), a finding that is pathognomonic of M. leprae. Original magnification ×1,000.

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