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Volume 19, Number 12—December 2013

Dispatch

Powassan Virus in Mammals, Alaska and New Mexico, USA, and Russia, 2004–2007

Eleanor R. DeardorffComments to Author , Robert A. Nofchissey, Joseph A. Cook, Andrew G. Hope, Albina Tsvetkova, Sandra L. Talbot, and Gregory D. Ebel
Author affiliations: University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA (E.R. Deardorff, R.A. Nofchissey, J.A. Cook); U S Geological Survey, Anchorage, Alaska, USA (A.G. Hope, S.L. Talbot); Institute of Biology, Moscow, Russia (A. Tsvetkova); Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA (G.D. Ebel)

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Table 2

Ticks collected from trapped mammals in southeastern Alaska, USA, June–July 2009, and tested by reverse transcription PCR for flavivirus RNA*

Host species No. Adult males Adult females Nymphs Lavae Total Average infestation
Microtus longicaudus 2 0 1 1 0 2 1.0
Microtus pennsylvanicus 1 0 0 1 0 1 1.0
Myodes gapperi 18 1 17 33 4 55 3.1
Myodes rutilus 12 0 5 9 2 16 1.3
Peromyscus keeni 21 2 16 33 26 77 3.7
Peromyscus maniculatus 5 0 2 3 0 5 1.0
Sorex cinereus 3 0 3 12 0 15 5.0
Sorex monticolus 10 0 0 18 22 40 4.0
Synaptomys borealis 1 0 0 10 0 10 10.0
Tamiasciurus hudsonicus 6 0 8 2 2 12 2.0
Total 79 3 52 122 56 233 2.9

*Several individual ticks (1 adult male, 3 adult females, and 12 nymphs) were not tested by reverse transcription PCR because of desiccation during storage. No larvae were tested. Infestation rate was calculated by dividing the total number of ticks by the total number of individuals for each mammalian species.

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