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Volume 19, Number 2—February 2013

Research

Rift Valley Fever, Sudan, 2007 and 2010

Imadeldin E. Aradaib, Bobbie R. Erickson, Rehab M. Elageb, Marina L. Khristova, Serena A. Carroll, Isam M. Elkhidir, Mubarak E. Karsany, AbdelRahim E. Karrar, Mustafa I. Elbashir, and Stuart T. NicholComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Republic of the Sudan (I.E. Aradaib, I.M. Elkhidir, A.E. Karrar, M.I. Elbashir); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (B.R. Erickson, M.L. Khristova, S.A. Carroll, S.T. Nichol); Federal Ministry of Health, Khartoum (R.M. Elageb, M.E. Karsany)

Main Article

Figure 1

Sudan and South Sudan. States with confirmed Rift Valley fever cases are in boldface. Light gray indicates Sudan; dark gray indicates South Sudan. The Nile, White Nile, and Blue Nile Rivers are depicted in white, and other bodies of water were removed for clarity.

Figure 1. . Sudan and South Sudan. States with confirmed Rift Valley fever cases are in boldface. Light gray indicates Sudan; dark gray indicates South Sudan. The Nile, White Nile, and Blue Nile Rivers are depicted in white, and other bodies of water were removed for clarity.

Main Article

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