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Volume 19, Number 2—February 2013

Research

Rift Valley Fever, Sudan, 2007 and 2010

Imadeldin E. Aradaib, Bobbie R. Erickson, Rehab M. Elageb, Marina L. Khristova, Serena A. Carroll, Isam M. Elkhidir, Mubarak E. Karsany, AbdelRahim E. Karrar, Mustafa I. Elbashir, and Stuart T. NicholComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Republic of the Sudan (I.E. Aradaib, I.M. Elkhidir, A.E. Karrar, M.I. Elbashir); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (B.R. Erickson, M.L. Khristova, S.A. Carroll, S.T. Nichol); Federal Ministry of Health, Khartoum (R.M. Elageb, M.E. Karsany)

Main Article

Figure 5

Phylogenetic analysis of complete Rift Valley fever virus L (large) segment sequences represented as an abbreviated maximum clade credibility tree. Asterisk indicates nodes with highest posterior density >0.95. Sudan sequences are shaded. Arrow indicates reassortant viruses. Scale bar represents substitutions per site per year. The complete tree is presented in Technical Appendix Figure 3. Country names appear in boldface, and strain names appear in italics.

Figure 5. . Phylogenetic analysis of complete Rift Valley fever virus L (large) segment sequences represented as an abbreviated maximum clade credibility tree. Asterisk indicates nodes with highest posterior density >0.95. Sudan sequences are shaded. Arrow indicates reassortant viruses. Scale bar represents substitutions per site per year. The complete tree is presented in Technical Appendix Figure 3. Country names appear in boldface, and strain names appear in italics.

Main Article

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