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Volume 19, Number 2—February 2013

Research

Severe Lower Respiratory Tract Infection in Early Infancy and Pneumonia Hospitalizations among Children, Kenya

Patrick Kiio MunywokiComments to Author , Eric O. Ohuma, Mwanajuma Ngama, Evasius Bauni, J. Anthony G. Scott, and D. James Nokes
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme Centre for Geographic Medicine Research–Coast, Kilifi, Kenya (P.K. Munywoki, E.O. Ohuma, M. Ngama, E. Bauni, J.A.G. Scott, D.J. Nokes); University of Oxford, Oxford, UK (E.O. Ohuma, J.A.G. Scott); University of Warwick, Coventry, UK (D.J. Nokes)

Main Article

Figure 1

Incidence rate ratios for readmission with pneumonia over follow-up time for each of 3 comparisons among children initially admitted during infancy to Kilifi District Hospital, coastal Kenya, April 16, 2002–May 31, 2010. A) Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) versus non-LRTI group; B) other LRTI versus non-LRTI group; C) all LRTI (RSV and other LRTI combined) versus non-LRTI group. Error bars indicate 95% CIs.

Figure 1. . Incidence rate ratios (IRR) for readmission with pneumonia over follow-up time for each of 3 comparisons among children initially admitted during infancy to Kilifi District Hospital, coastal Kenya, April 16, 2002–May 31, 2010. A) Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) versus non-LRTI group; B) other LRTI versus non-LRTI group; C) all LRTI (RSV and other LRTI combined) versus non-LRTI group. Error bars indicate 95% CIs.

Main Article

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