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Volume 19, Number 2—February 2013

Synopsis

Nipah Virus Infection Outbreak with Nosocomial and Corpse-to-Human Transmission, Bangladesh

Hossain M.S. SazzadComments to Author , M. Jahangir Hossain, Emily S. Gurley, Kazi M.H. Ameen, Shahana Parveen, M. Saiful Islam, Labib I. Faruque, Goutam Podder, Sultana S. Banu, Michael K. Lo, Pierre E. Rollin, Paul A. Rota, Peter Daszak, Mahmudur Rahman, and Stephen P. Luby
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: icddr,b, Dhaka, Bangladesh (H.M.S. Sazzad, M.J. Hossain, E.S. Gurley, S. Parveen, M.S. Islam, L.I. Faruque, G. Podder, S.P. Luby); Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control and Research, Dhaka (K.M.H. Ameen, S.S. Banu, M. Rahman); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (M.K. Lo, P.E. Rollin, P.A. Rota, S.P. Luby); EcoHealth Alliance, New York, New York, USA (P. Daszak)

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Table 1

Demographic and clinical features of outbreak and sporadic case-patients with encephalitis caused by Nipah virus infection, Faridpur, Bangladesh, 2010*

Feature
First-generation outbreak, n = 4
Second-generation outbreak, n = 4
Sporadic, n = 8
All, n = 16
Median age, y (range) 28 (10–45) 55 (32–60) 23 (4–45) 35 (4–60)
Male sex
1 (25)
3 (75)
5 (63)
9 (56)
Clinical features
Fever 4 (100) 4 (100) 8 (100) 16 (100)
Altered mental status 4 (100) 3 (75) 8 (100) 15 (94)
Unconscious 4 (100) 2 (50) 8 (100) 14 (88)
Difficulty breathing 2 (50) 3 (75) 7 (88) 12 (75)
Headache 4 (100) 2 (50) 4 (50) 10 (63)
Vomiting 4 (100) 1 (25) 3 (38) 8 (50)
Convulsion
3 (75)
1 (25)
3 (38)
7 (44)
Case-fatality rate 4 (100) 3 (75) 7 (88) 14 (88)
Median days (range) from onset of illness to death 7 (4–8) 6 (3–7) 4 (4–17) 5 (3–17)†

*Values are no. (%) case-patients except as indicated.
†n = 14, all of whom died.

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