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Volume 19, Number 3—March 2013

Research

Effects of Vaccine Program against Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1) Virus, United States, 2009–2010

Rebekah H. Borse1, Sundar S. Shrestha, Anthony E. Fiore, Charisma Y. Atkins, James A. Singleton, Carolyn Furlow, and Martin I. MeltzerComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Main Article

Table 7

Sensitivity analyses showing estimates of clinical cases prevented by acceleration of vaccination against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus*

Dates of vaccination program Point estimate Range
Hypothetical dates
2009 Aug 08–2010 21 Feb 4,176,031 2,974,975–5,970,682
2009 Aug 15–2010 28 Feb 3,742,600 2,674,232–5,322,588
2009 Aug 22–2010 07 Mar 3,299,591 2,366,468–4,668,558
2009 Aug 29–2010 14 Mar 2,855,894 2,054,754–4,020,843
2009 Sep 05–2010 21 Mar 2,422,481 1,747,781–3,398,603
2009 Sep 12–2010 28 Mar 2,010,198 1,450,291–2,817,245
2009 Sep 19–2010 04 Apr 1,633,200 1,171,673–2,292,018
2009 Sep 26–2010 11 Apr
1,303,621
922,931–1,836,514
Actual dates
2009 Oct 03–2010 18 Apr† 1,029,157 712,908–1,458,930

*The epidemic curve that was used to generate these estimates was the base case estimate, which was based on the assumption that a vaccination program did not exist. Data reflect calculations made for scenario 5 by estimating effects of moving the start date of the program to begin 8 weeks to 1 week earlier.
†See Table 2, Appendix, wwwnc.cdc.gov/EID/article/19/3/12-0394-T2.htm.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: Merck & Co., Inc., Lansdale, Pennsylvania, USA.

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