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Volume 19, Number 5—May 2013

Research

Foodborne Transmission of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy to Nonhuman Primates

Edgar HolznagelComments to Author , Barbara Yutzy, Walter Schulz-Schaeffer, Carina Kruip, Uwe Hahmann, Pär Bierke, Juan-Maria Torres, Yong-Sun Kim, Achim Thomzig, Michael Beekes, Gerhard Hunsmann, and Johannes Loewer
Author affiliations: Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Langen, Germany (E. Holznagel, B. Yutzy, C. Kruip, J. Loewer); University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany (W. Schulz-Schaeffer); German Primate Centre, Göttingen (U. Hahmann, G. Hunsmann); Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna, Sweden (P. Bierke); Centro de Investigación en Sanidad Animal, Madrid, Spain (J.-M. Torres); Hallym University, Anyang, Gyeonggi-Do, South Korea (Y.-S. Kim); Robert-Koch-Institut, Berlin, Germany (A. Thomzig, M. Beekes)

Main Article

Figure 6

Paraffin-embedded tissue blot analyses of lumbar spinal cord segments from the preclinical macaque S14 (A) and a clinically ill macaque (B) for detection and localization of proteinease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) ) deposits. These deposits could be detected in the substantia gelatinosa (arrows) of preclinical cases.

Figure 6. . Paraffin-embedded tissue blot analyses of lumbar spinal cord segments from the preclinical macaque S14 (A) and a clinically ill macaque (B) for detection and localization of proteinease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) ) deposits. These deposits could be detected in the substantia gelatinosa (arrows) of preclinical cases.

Main Article

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