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Volume 19, Number 5—May 2013

Research

Targeting Surveillance for Zoonotic Virus Discovery

Jordan Levinson1, Tiffany L. Bogich1, Kevin J. Olival, Jonathan H. Epstein, Christine K. Johnson, William Karesh, and Peter DaszakComments to Author 
Author affiliations: EcoHealth Alliance, New York, New York, USA (J. Levinson, T.L. Bogich, K.J. Olival, J.H. Epstein, W. Karesh, P. Daszak); National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA (T.L. Bogich); Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA (T.L. Bogich); School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California, USA (C.K. Johnson)

Main Article

Figure 2

Probability of being symptomatic as determined by logistic regression analysis, with bias reduction of whether a host is diseased, for 234 mammal–virus pairs. Pairs represent mammals from 5 taxonomic orders and viruses from 10 taxonomic families. Probabilities are based on the predicted values of the logistic regression and are given on a 5-point gray scale (key on right). CIs were calculated asthe coefficient plus 1.96 × SE (from Table). See Table for detailed results of the regression analysis

Figure 2. . Probability of being symptomatic as determined by logistic regression analysis, with bias reduction of whether a host is diseased, for 234 mammal–virus pairs. Pairs represent mammals from 5 taxonomic orders and viruses from 10 taxonomic families. Probabilities are based on the predicted values of the logistic regression and are given on a 5-point gray scale (key on right). CIs were calculated asthe coefficient plus 1.96 × SE (from Table). See Table for detailed results of the regression analysis.

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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