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Volume 19, Number 6—June 2013

Letter

Absence of Rift Valley Fever Virus in Wild Small Mammals, Madagascar

Marie-Marie OliveComments to Author , Nadia Razafindralambo, Tony Andrianaivo Barivelo, Jean-Théophile Rafisandratantsoa, Voahangy Soarimalala, Steven M. Goodman, Pierre E. Rollin, Jean-Michel Heraud, and Jean-Marc Reynes
Author affiliations: Institut Pasteur, Antananarivo, Madagascar (M.-M. Olive, N. Razafindralambo, J.-T. Rafisandratantsoa, J.-M. Heraud); Association Vahatra, Antananarivo (T. Andrianaivo Barivelo, V. Soarimalala, S.M. Goodman); Université d’Antananarivo, Antananarivo (T. Andrianaivo Barivelo); Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, Illinois, USA (S.M. Goodman); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (P.E. Rollin); Institut Pasteur, Lyon, France (J.-M. Reynes)

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Figure

Collection sites of wild terrestrial small mammals on Madagascar and the number of mammals tested for Rift Valle fever virus (RVFV). At certain localities, the genus and species of sampled rats were Rattus rattus or R. norvegicus.

Figure. . Collection sites of wild terrestrial small mammals on Madagascar and the number of mammals tested for Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). At certain localities, the genus and species of sampled rats were Rattus rattus or R. norvegicus.

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