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Volume 19, Number 6—June 2013

Letter

Wild Poliovirus Importation, Central African Republic1

Ionela Gouandjika-Vasilache, Arthur Mazitchi, Nicksy Gumede, Alexandre Manirakiza, Casimir Manenegu, Thomas D’Aquin Koyazegbe, and Cara Burns
Author affiliations: Institut Pasteur, Bangui, Central African Republic (I. Gouandjika-Vasilache, A. Mazitchi, A. Manirakiza); National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Johannesburg, South Africa (N. Gumede); World Health Organization, Bangui (C. Manenegu); Ministère de la Santé, de la Population et de la lute contre le SIDA, Bangui (T. D’Aquin Koyazegbe); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (C. Burns)

Main Article

Figure

Clusters of polio cases caused by wild poliovirus importations, Central African Republic, 2008–2011. Each circle represents 1 case of acute flaccid paralysis confirmed as polio. Black circles, cluster B2D1B, 2008 poliovirus (PV) type 1 SOAS importation from Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo); white circles, cluster D2B2B1, 2009 PV3 WEAF-B importation from Nigeria and southern Chad; gray circles, cluster I6C2B4C1A2, 2011 PV1 WEAF-B importation from southern Chad.

Figure. . . Clusters of polio cases caused by wild poliovirus importations, Central African Republic, 2008–2011. Each circle represents 1 case of acute flaccid paralysis confirmed as polio. Black circles, cluster B2D1B, 2008 poliovirus (PV) type 1 SOAS importation from Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo); white circles, cluster D2B2B1, 2009 PV3 WEAF-B importation from Nigeria and southern Chad; gray circles, cluster I6C2B4C1A2, 2011 PV1 WEAF-B importation from southern Chad.

Main Article

1Data from this report were presented to the Global Polio Laboratory Network, Geneva, Switzerland, and at the First International Conference of the African Society of Laboratory Medicine, 2012 Dec 1–7, Cape Town, South Africa.

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