Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 19, Number 7—July 2013

Dispatch

Novel Bartonella Agent as Cause of Verruga Peruana

David L. BlazesComments to Author , Kristin Mullins, Bonnie L. Smoak, Ju Jiang, Enrique Canal, Nelson Solorzano, Eric Hall, Rina Meza, Ciro Maguina, Todd Myers, Allen L. Richards, and Larry Laughlin
Author affiliations: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland, USA (D.L. Blazes, K. Mullins, B.L. Smoak, L. Laughlin); Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA (B.L. Smoak); Naval Medical Research Center, Silver Spring (J. Jiang, E. Hall, T. Myers, A.L. Richards); Naval Medical Research Unit 6, Lima, Peru (E. Canal, R. Meza); Hospital San Juan de Dios, Lima (N. Solorzano); Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia–Tropicales, Lima (C. Maguina)

Main Article

Figure 2

Phylogeny for concatenated sequences of novel Bartonella isolate, including a 312-character fragment of gltA and a 589-character fragment of rpoB. The neighbor-joining tree method (1,000 bootstrap replicates) was employed using MEGA5 software (11), and the distances were calculated by using the Jukes-Cantor method, in which units are calculated as the number of base pair substitutions per site (10). Brucella melitensis was used as the outgroup.

Figure 2. . Phylogeny for concatenated sequences of novel Bartonella isolate (boldface), including a 312-character fragment of gltA and a 589-character fragment of rpoB. The neighbor-joining tree method (1,000 bootstrap replicates) was employed using MEGA5 software (11), and the distances were calculated by using the Jukes-Cantor method, in which units are calculated as the number of base pair substitutions per site (10). Brucella melitensis was used as the outgroup.

Main Article

TOP