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Volume 19, Number 8—August 2013

Dispatch

Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning, Washington, USA, 2011

Jennifer K. LloydComments to Author , Jeffrey S. Duchin, Jerry Borchert, Harold Flores Quintana, and Alison Robertson
Author affiliations: Public Health—Seattle & King County, Seattle, Washington, USA (J.K. Lloyd, J.S. Duchin); University of Washington, Seattle (J.S. Duchin); Washington State Department of Health, Tumwater, Washington, USA (J. Borchert); US Food and Drug Administration, Dauphin Island, Alabama, USA (H. Flores Quintana, A. Robertson)

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Figure 2

Timeline comparing blooms of Dinophysis spp. dinoflagellates and diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxin levels detected in mussels collected during 2011 from Sequim Bay State Park, Sequim, Washington, USA. Dinophysis spp. cell counts per liter (black line) were determined by using light microscopy. Total okadaic acid (OA) equivalents (red line), in micrograms per 100 g shellfish tissue, were determined by using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analysis (15). Dashed line indicates US Food an

Figure 2. . Timeline comparing blooms of Dinophysis spp. dinoflagellates and diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxin levels detected in mussels collected during 2011 from Sequim Bay State Park, Sequim, Washington, USA. Dinophysis spp. cell counts per liter (black line) were determined by using light microscopy. Total okadaic acid (OA) equivalents (red line), in micrograms per 100 g shellfish tissue, were determined by using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analysis (14). Dashed line indicates US Food and Drug Administration guidance level of 16 µg total OA equivalents per 100 g shellfish tissue. Dates shown are collection dates for each tested sample.

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